Jump to content

Logo

Today's Active Posts

Photo
- - - - -

48-hour Survival Bag/BOB

first aid survival bug out bag emergency disaster

16 replies to this topic

#1 Mikey Bautista

Mikey Bautista

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1002 posts
  • LocationPhilippines

Posted 12 June 2015 - 04:54 AM

So in the span of a year I've personally known three people with their families who lost EVERYTHING in a fire, had a few monsoon scares (which aren't even the supertyphoons that have wrecked the Philippines before), a few floods just at the start of this rainy season for us, and now earthquake scares and nationwide earthquake prep.

 

I get the hint, it's time to be prepared for the worst case scenario. Taking a page from the other threads in this forum and the idea that special forces can grab a bag filled with all the necessities they'll need to be anywhere in the world for any situation for 48 hours, I've now started building my kit.

 

KIT IS HERE

 

I'm going for maximum utlity but still something I can carry on my shoulders while running for my life (so no heavy batteries or inverters or lanterns when I already have a light listed).

 

This is obviously going to be a very long work in progress, but I'd appreciate any ideas on what to add or remove. Thanks guys! Stuff highlighted in yellow are stuff that expire and will be replaced as a group.


  • Marc and big Easy like this

#2 Marc

Marc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 555 posts
  • LocationOttawa, Canada

Posted 12 June 2015 - 09:32 AM

Good list, Mikey.  I would add a multi-tool (for pliers/cutters), and maybe a hat (I'm a hat person :-) ) and/or bandana, and a lighter.  You could remove the shoe laces since you have 100' of paracord.  I assume plastic bags are large garbage bags?


  • Mikey Bautista likes this

#3 Mikey Bautista

Mikey Bautista

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1002 posts
  • LocationPhilippines

Posted 12 June 2015 - 11:53 AM

Good list, Mikey.  I would add a multi-tool (for pliers/cutters), and maybe a hat (I'm a hat person :-) ) and/or bandana, and a lighter.  You could remove the shoe laces since you have 100' of paracord.  I assume plastic bags are large garbage bags?

 

Good points! I was thinking of a SAK Cybertool Lite as my main tool but maybe a Leatherman with proper pliers and cutters could be an additions. Hat maybe the softshell should have a hood already, bandanna good one, and lighter -- I'll have to find a nice sealed one so the butane doesn't evaporate every two weeks, haha. Good point on the paracord also, I'll remove the laces. :)

 

And yes, large garbage bags to double as shelter/protection/covering.



#4 coldwater

coldwater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1381 posts

Posted 12 June 2015 - 12:39 PM

That's a good list Mikey. That's a lot of water to carry. For my bag, I carry only 4 water packs, a collapsing bottle and a life straw. Included in my FAK is iodine, purification tabs, and a little vial of bleach. I can find water anywhere, and with these things, I can purify it without having to carry it with me. The little hydro packs are just a quick thirst killer if I'm on the run.  

If you wear glasses, pack an extra. Same with sun glasses. A cheap pair is good to stick in the bag. Also, I would recommend a duplicate license / ID  or any other important papers you may need. A little cheap sewing kit is handy as well. And I can't stress this enough, Dental floss is awesome. You get a LOT of it in a tiny container, and it has something like a 20 LB breaking strength. The shit is gold in a bag. As an upgrade for the space blanket, check out , SOL large size emergency blankets. MUCH better bigger and stronger. (although I do keep a couple cheap space blankets as well.)


  • Mikey Bautista, Marc and Kemma Ches like this

#5 Mikey Bautista

Mikey Bautista

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1002 posts
  • LocationPhilippines

Posted 12 June 2015 - 02:02 PM

That's a good list Mikey. That's a lot of water to carry. For my bag, I carry only 4 water packs, a collapsing bottle and a life straw. Included in my FAK is iodine, purification tabs, and a little vial of bleach. I can find water anywhere, and with these things, I can purify it without having to carry it with me. The little hydro packs are just a quick thirst killer if I'm on the run.  

If you wear glasses, pack an extra. Same with sun glasses. A cheap pair is good to stick in the bag. Also, I would recommend a duplicate license / ID  or any other important papers you may need. A little cheap sewing kit is handy as well. And I can't stress this enough, Dental floss is awesome. You get a LOT of it in a tiny container, and it has something like a 20 LB breaking strength. The shit is gold in a bag. As an upgrade for the space blanket, check out , SOL large size emergency blankets. MUCH better bigger and stronger. (although I do keep a couple cheap space blankets as well.)

 

Excellent stuff! Good point on the water -- I can probably downsize those especially since I'll have some sort of filtration planned, and I can add those purification tabs as well. Wife wears glasses so I'll have her get a spare when she gets refitted. Floss is a good one, I'll put that in. :)

 

Thanks so far guys!



#6 Rob Hamilton

Rob Hamilton

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 29 posts

Posted 14 June 2015 - 01:11 PM

To your excellent list I would consider adding:

  • collapsible water carrier (not sure if your water packs are reusable)
  • bivvy bag (better all-round shelter/protection than a thermal blanket on its own)
  • walkie-talkies (pair)
  • strong thread and needles (second the vote for dental floss)
  • sweets/candies (huge comfort value in emergencies, especially for frightened children)
  • good warm microfibre hat for cold nights
  • antiseptic hand gel (doubles as deodorant)
  • definitely a multi-tool of some kind
  • a couple of chemical light sticks

I'd top up the medical kit's antiseptic wipes and bandaids/elastoplast (with a roll of fabric plaster tape), add some more safety pins, and pack double the number of AA batteries. And I'd prefer a notebook that I could tear pages out of (to leave notes at rendezvous locations or to send messages). I'd also attach a collapsible trecking pole to the bag (good for uneven/unstable ground, fending off dogs, etc).

 

Plus, what are your assumptions about a phone? 

 

Further thought: on your USB stick a copy of household/vehicle insurance policies, plus photos of specific valuable items. Somewhere a hard copy of key contact numbers - for use if your own phone dies and you need to use someone else's.


  • Mikey Bautista and Marc like this

#7 Mikey Bautista

Mikey Bautista

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 1002 posts
  • LocationPhilippines

Posted 14 June 2015 - 09:36 PM

To your excellent list I would consider adding:

  • collapsible water carrier (not sure if your water packs are reusable)
  • bivvy bag (better all-round shelter/protection than a thermal blanket on its own)
  • walkie-talkies (pair)
  • strong thread and needles (second the vote for dental floss)
  • sweets/candies (huge comfort value in emergencies, especially for frightened children)
  • good warm microfibre hat for cold nights
  • antiseptic hand gel (doubles as deodorant)
  • definitely a multi-tool of some kind
  • a couple of chemical light sticks

I'd top up the medical kit's antiseptic wipes and bandaids/elastoplast (with a roll of fabric plaster tape), add some more safety pins, and pack double the number of AA batteries. And I'd prefer a notebook that I could tear pages out of (to leave notes at rendezvous locations or to send messages). I'd also attach a collapsible trecking pole to the bag (good for uneven/unstable ground, fending off dogs, etc).

 

Plus, what are your assumptions about a phone? 

 

Further thought: on your USB stick a copy of household/vehicle insurance policies, plus photos of specific valuable items. Somewhere a hard copy of key contact numbers - for use if your own phone dies and you need to use someone else's.

 

Thanks Rob, appreciate the feedback! My thoughts on your suggestions are:

 

1. Water carrier -- I'll check if I have space, but I think I would just be able to reuse my water bottles for a few days?

2. Bivvy bag -- I would but the price difference is literally 5x than just the blanket at my local vendor, ouch. Something for the future!

3. Walkie talkies -- I'll check if I can manage the space, plus costly

4. Thread and needles -- good one, I'll add that

5. Sweets/candies -- the granola bars I eat (Fitbar) have chocolate on them, so double duty :P

6. Hat -- I don't think I'd need with the bandanna + jacket/poncho with hood combos

7. Hand gel -- might be redundant since I'm packing alcohol

8. Multitool -- SAK should cover most of my bases, and slightly costly in price and weight if I bring two

9. Light sticks -- this I can eventually spare

10. The Adventure Medical Kit I'm looking at should cover the wipes, bandages, and tape.

11. Double AA batteries might be overkill since the light I'm planning on (a second ThruNite T10) can last 6 days on a single AA on its lowest setting.

12. Notebook with tearable pages, I think I can manage with the one I have + Sharpie

13. Trekking pole, this one I'll consider.

14. For a phone, my 6 Plus is already on me and can last 1.5 days on a single charge, so with a solar charger I'm assuming I can last a full 48 and more if I turn off all its radios.

15. Printed contact numbers, that goes on.

 

Thanks again!


  • Marc likes this

#8 Marc

Marc

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 13 October 2015 - 11:19 AM

Mikey, I am thinking of moving back to the Philippines in a few years. Being that floods there are a reality of everyday living, have you included some wading pants to go through floodwaters?  or do you just carry extra alcohol/dissinfectant and go through flood waters in shorts?  Any suggestions from other members on here who had to go through floodwaters?



#9 Marc

Marc

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 13 October 2015 - 11:24 AM

I was reading your list, I tried packing canned goods in my BOB before and it was just too heavy. It weighed almost 70LBS (this for 3 people).  I now replaced all the canned goods with high calorie Millenium Bars (400CAL per bar), and made 2 separate BOBs.  One is for 1 child + adult, the other for 2 Adults.



#10 jonathan jone

jonathan jone

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 13 October 2015 - 09:23 PM

How about bringing in a medical kit ? It  can help you respond effectively to common injuries and emergencies



#11 WallyGator

WallyGator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 437 posts
  • LocationSwamps of Florida

Posted 14 October 2015 - 06:58 AM

I'd add a pair of gloves. You never know what you might have to pick up or move. Tetanus and risk of infection is very real in this types of situations. Also consider adding Benadryl and a broad spectrum antibiotic like Ampicillin or Cipro to your list of meds. You might have to find a willing doc to get the antibiotics but you would be well served to have them on hand. 


  • David E likes this

#12 David E

David E

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 88 posts

Posted 14 October 2015 - 11:59 AM

 

 

Two hurrahs for the Benadryl.  Indispensable for allergic reactions, stuffy noses, etc.   What most people don't realize is that it is an effective anti-emetic (stops you from throwing up/nausea) as well.  it's my go-to for when I or my kids are puky. A blister pack of those would be great.  Also an Epi-pen if someone has a need. 

 

Don't forget superglue for wounds, etc...  Also, you left out any form of self-defense.  I would carry some kind of knife, perhaps mace and a small firearm.



#13 WallyGator

WallyGator

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 437 posts
  • LocationSwamps of Florida

Posted 14 October 2015 - 07:08 PM

Two hurrahs for the Benadryl.  Indispensable for allergic reactions, stuffy noses, etc.   What most people don't realize is that it is an effective anti-emetic (stops you from throwing up/nausea) as well.  it's my go-to for when I or my kids are puky. A blister pack of those would be great.  Also an Epi-pen if someone has a need. 

 

Don't forget superglue for wounds, etc...  Also, you left out any form of self-defense.  I would carry some kind of knife, perhaps mace and a small firearm.

 

Diphenhydramine or Benadryl is one of the wonder drugs for me. Available over the counter and has so many uses. It can be given to adults, kids  and even a allergic border collie. 



#14 armydoc

armydoc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 273 posts

Posted 26 October 2015 - 02:19 PM

Mikey,

 

Some of the things I would recommend other fellas like Wally have already suggested like a good pair of work gloves, and a hat. The hat I have used is from a company called "Sundayafternoons.com" It is a lightweight vented hat with a huge floppy brim and tail that will cover the full length of your neck.

 

You are building a 48hr go bag to get you from point A to point B, B being a place of safety. Do you plan on keeping this go bag in your vehicle?

 

I would add in a case of bottled water to your vehicle. It is very cheap security as you can take what you need to fill your personal water containers and either give some away as charity or even barter. Rotate it out every few weeks.

 

WATER

As far as water containers go, the Camelbak water bladders are very popular and I used them in the military however they can be punctured. You want to have at least 1 hard plastic military type canteen with you perhaps in conjunction with a bladder type water container. Another option would be a steel single walled bottle like the popular Kleen Kanteen. The advantage to the steel bottle is that you can boil water in it. Make sure it is a single walled bottle or canteen as a doubled wall bottle can explode when heated.

 

BOOTS

While I think it is great to have a pair of rugged lightweight sandals with you it is very important to have a pair of rugged broken in hiking boots or military type boots. I suggest the ones with a hard rubber sole versus the tactical sneaker style that you see today.

 

The concern you had was flooding. You will want to protect your feet with a pair of boots in contaminated water where you would no doubt be stepping on all types of debris. You want to use sandals for allowing your feet to dry out as well as your boots.

 

You need to pack some foot powder and moleskin for your feet. Remember to massage in the powder to your feet as this will help with circulation. DO NOT shoot powder into your socks as it can clump and blister your feet. When you stop to take a break from walking make sure you check and massage and powder your feet. If you feel a hot spot on your foot, if safety permits stop and address it.

 

One of the things you will face and it will take you out quickly is something called "Trench foot". Your feet being constantly damp will break down your skin, cause all your toenails to fallout, leave you open for infection and if the infection goes into the bloodstream it can kill you. While all this is taking place something so simple as not caring for your feet will absolutely immobilize you. You will go nowhere.

 

MEDICAL

Medical wise you were not specific enough for me as Adventure Medical Kits makes multiple kits.

 

If you are slogging along in contaminated water you figure there will be dead animals as well as people, I would see about talking to your family doctor and getting a prescription of antibiotics that would address the type of illnesses that you would encounter under the outlined conditions. If you cannot get antibiotics from the doctor there are other options. Search online for alternatives like fish antibiotics and livestock antibiotics. Many preppers use these means but it takes research and personal responsibility and at your own risk.

 

Keep your meds in a small waterproof container or bag. Keep your band-aids and other minor 1st aid items separate from your trauma gear.

 

NAVIGATION

Pack a laminated map for the areas you operate in, go to school, work, etc. If SHTF take the map/s that apply to you when you grab your bag and go, leave the rest behind. If your budget allows you might consider a handheld GPS but even if you invest in one you still need to carry the map and compass as a backup.

 

CLOTHING

Well in a natural disaster you may face looting, roving bands of people robbing others. You might consider clothing that allows you to blend into your environment. You do not need to wear military camouflage fatigues, that could draw attention from authorities. Subdued earthy tones for clothes is good. It can keep you more low profile and help keep people from wondering what cool items you may have in your pack.

 

You want to have the clothes made from materials that will wick away moisture and are lightweight. You can find these types of clothing even in places like Walmart (if they have Walmarts in your country). In other words you don't need to blow $400.00 on a tactical pair of pants. 

 

Pants wise I like fatigue pants, you can get them in solid colors and even in shorts if you so choose. If you do decide on camouflage the best single style for all environments is the "Multi-Cam" by Crye Precision.

 

SHELTER

In a flooded environment should you have to bed down in that, you will want to have a mosquito net. Mosquitos and flies are major disease vectors. And in a flood will be out in full force in such an environment.

 

SnugPak makes something called the "Jungle Bag" that is meant for tropical environments and has a built in net for insects. I would still pack a full mosquito net separately. A military poncho can complete your shelter system with this bag. The poncho can also be used for collecting rain water if setup properly.

 

FOOD

Ditch the canned goods as you will be carrying extra weight for no reason Remember ounces equal pounds and pounds equal pain. I will tell you what a Special Forces Soldier told me about food for a go bag. he said pack bullion cubes. You will not need a lot of food for 48 hours. The bullion will help flavor water that may not taste so good.

 

You do not want to eat without having water as you will dehydrate yourself, If you want some food for your planned 48hr kit, consider the tuna and chicken breasts that come packed in a heavy foil pouch. for protein.  Some M&M peanuts for carbs. Consider some freeze dried foods in foil pouches like Mountain House as they are lighter to carry and you won't be eating unless you have water. For 48hrs or even 72hrs food is not going to be your biggest concern. Military style MREs (Meals Ready To Eat) are yet another option. 1 MRE is designed to give you the calories you need to sustain you for 24hrs. So in theory you only would need 2 in your pack.



#15 armydoc

armydoc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 273 posts

Posted 26 October 2015 - 03:03 PM

Mikey (continued)

 

Pack

Make sure the pack you choose to carry your gear is designed to carry the target weight of your gear. You also want to make sure that the pack is the right fit and size for your build. If it is not it can hinder your extrication from a dangerous environment to a safe one.

 

Consider the use of lightweight waterproof dry bags to keep your gear dry inside the pack should you get your pack submerged.

 

 

SELF DEFENSE

 

I looked up the gun laws in the Philippines and what I read says that you can own and carry a firearm with proper licensing.. What I was not sure about is whether or not you can carry firearms that are chambered for a "military caliber". For self defense I would recommend a Glock 19 with a Incog appendix carry holster made by G-Code. 9mm is a very common caliber and likely what your military and police carry. So in a worst case scenario commonality in ammunition means you will be more likely to be able to acquire more if needed. https://www.youtube....h?v=j1mvHZIQu7s Incog holster

 

The reason I suggest a Glock 19 is it is simple, effective, battle proven, common caliber.

 

Two upgrades for the Glock 19 is a steel guide rod, the Gen 4 might already have this upgrade. The Surefire XC1 weapon light.

https://www.youtube....h?v=xlGz6NMpSvk  XC1 Weapon light

 

If you decide to go for this setup G-Code makes a variant of the Incog holster that will fit the weapon light.

 

If you want a revolver Smith and Wesson or Ruger is a great choice. You can get a revolver in 9mm.

 

If you want something that is survival first (food gathering)/defense second, a Smith and Wesson 617 10 shot revolver, Ruger charger, Ruger 10//22 takedown, Ruger Mark III 22 pistol.

 

You will also want a good stiff gun belt.

 

Whatever you decide to carry make sure you have a compact cleaning kit.

 

Also get a good handheld light, some lights can be used as impact weapons as well. Even if you have a light on your firearms you do not want to be pointing a weapon randomly for the sake of using the light.

 

 

BATTERIES

You might consider carrying some extra batteries for your electronics as trying to recharge your items on the go can be difficult or impossible depending on the weather. For a solar powered recharge option research a fold up solar panel. You can take this and attach it to the outside of your pack and charge as you go.

 

FINAL THOUGHTS

Whatever gear you carry make sure that it has as many uses as possible. I would nix the luxury items like toothpaste, toothbrush for the simple reason it is not needed for what you are building the pack for. Dental floss will suffice for oral hygiene for 48hrs, can be used as suture material, fishing line and can even be used to build a shelter.

 

Ditch the toilet paper and carry some more baby wipes as you can use the wipes to clean your arse, your feet and everything else for that matter. If the baby wipes get wet you are still good to go. If the toilet paper gets wet you are out of luck.

 

I think I covered most of the points I was aiming for. :)



#16 Daleemax

Daleemax

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 01 November 2015 - 09:33 PM

Something that i was taught when i would go backpacking with my father was to change the laces of your boots with Paracord. saves some room in your bag And You'd be surprised how much extra cordage you can pack onto your boots while keeping them Lightweight. i usually have an extra foot of cord or so onto each boot that i just wrap around the ankle of my boots so if you were in a situation where you needed it you'd just untie the boots, cut your lengths and then re-tie/ re-lace the boots and you're on your way.



#17 armydoc

armydoc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 273 posts

Posted 08 November 2015 - 01:01 AM

Dale here is a trick for you with using 550 cord for boot laces.

 

You can take out the guts of the 550 cord lace so you just have the empty outer shell and run a length of Kevlar cord/thread through it. Kevlar thread will cut through zip ties, rope, and duct tape.

 

You can partially seal up the end on one side so it cannot be easily detected and then when needed you simply pull the melted tip back exposing the Kevlar thread.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: first aid, survival, bug out bag, emergency, disaster

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users