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Moisture meters for firewood


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#1 Ephie

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 04:38 PM

Anyone use a moisture meter for firewood?  If you do is there any you would recommend?

Thanks.



#2 coldwater

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Posted 02 January 2018 - 05:50 PM

As a 40 year woodworker and joiner, I can tell you this without reservation, forget about even trying this.



#3 Ephie

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 08:18 AM

As a 40 year woodworker and joiner, I can tell you this without reservation, forget about even trying this.

Thanks coldwater, that is the kind of straightforward and knowledgeable feedback I am looking for.



#4 coldwater

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:27 AM

Sorry for the short answer, was on the run. I use lignomats just about every day to check moisture content in freshly skinned lumber before making someone a $30,000 grand entryway that will shrink and look like hell in short order if the moisture content is too high. Firewood would be all but impossible to gage this way, as it's not a kiln dried to specifics lumber. Also, the range of burn and build are no where close to one another. For firewood, If you're cutting dead standing trees, you're probably good to burn straight off the saw, if you're cutting live, generally speaking, you'll need one year from cut. If you want to mill logs into lumber, general rule of thumb is one year an inch for controlled air dry before you can even think about slapping it for final dry. For best results, cut the tree to lengths and split right away. (It's usually easier to split when green anyway) then stack out of the weather. The wood I'm burning in the fireplace now was cut and split a year ago. Next years wood is in another shed split and stacked to season for use next fall. 



#5 Ephie

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 11:09 AM

That is great information, thanks.  I am still educating myself on processing and using firewood so I very happy for any and all pointers. 



#6 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 03 January 2018 - 10:31 PM

Good information here. I actually was just wondering about checking moist content in firewood.

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