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50 Tools You Need To Survive Life


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#1 Ephie

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 10:35 AM

 I have really been enjoying this video series.  Having lived the bulk of my life in an apartment in a city, my knowledge of tools is extremely limited.  However, I have always wanted learn. 

I recently bought a house and so have a new found motivation to learn about different tools and how to use them.

The guy who did the videos is a homesteader and so has more knowledge and hands on tool use then I would have in multiple lifetimes but I have appreciated the education and recommendations he provides.  I have liked other videos on his channel as well.

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3MRtoh5ZRM&t=198s

 



#2 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 04:59 PM

I love his videos. He covers a lot of topics I'm interested in

EDC Culture

‚Äčgearfacts.com

 

 


#3 Ephie

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Posted 28 November 2017 - 05:15 PM

I love his videos. He covers a lot of topics I'm interested in

Yes, I do as well.  I found his site last year and have learned a great deal watching his videos.



#4 Ephie

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 11:52 AM



#5 Ephie

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Posted 10 January 2018 - 09:40 AM

Last installment 



#6 coldwater

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Posted 12 January 2018 - 08:16 AM

Entertaining, but in my opinion not much useful information. Buying tools for yourself can in fact be a tiresome and usually costly proposition. The choice is also as personal as choosing a wife. What works for me may be of no use to you. Between being a contractor, woodworker  and home and property owner, I probably have  $20K in tools from mechanic to woodworking, not to mention a truckload of hoists chainsaws and commercial landscaping equipment. I didn't just run out and buy these things, I acquired them out of very specific needs over a period of decades. I will agree 100% that certain tools are a must if you're a homeowner. You should have them as soon as you buy your home, and add to them as tasks arise.

Being raised as I was, I rarely ever hired anyone to do my work. I can plumb, wire build my own home, and in fact have done so. I also do it for a living. No formal training, so to speak, I just figured it out because I refuse to fail at anything or pay others to do the work I can do myself. I also believe that anyone can do it with the right mindset. 

 

Never just run out and start buying tools for no good reason. You'll spend a fortune of things you may never use, or worse, buy inferior tools. Even the simple carpenters hammer comes in a host of sizes and very specific uses. Buying the wrong one for the job will make you miserable. Also, never EVER buy a cheap tool. Save your money do the research, ask questions to the people that use them every day, and buy what you NEED as the job comes up, instead of what someone thinks you should have. 

I refuse to buy wood handled ground implements. Reinforced fiberglas is miles ahead in durability and lifespan, and you don't have to coat them in linseed oil every damned season to protect them. Also, never buy a steel handled strike tool like Estwing hammers or hatchets. Use one long enough and you'll know why. 

 

As a new homeowner, buy a high quality shovel, steel,  and leaf rake, and if you have trees or shrubs, a good hand pruner, long handled lopper, and a pole saw. I guarantee you will use these 

Also, go buy a quality set of mechanics tools. You don't need to go as far as buying roll away cabinet full of everything under the sun, but a good set of the basics will save you money over the long run, and make life easier. Add to them as time and needs go on. Only way to learn skills is to go hands on, and tools make that happen. 

 

As those skills begin to come to you so will confidence. When that happens, you'll begin to understand your needs and what to buy when you need it. As your NEEDED tool collection grows, so will you. I firmly believe that every man needs to put his hands to rough work, and know how to make and fix rather than throw away and buy, or pay someone else to do it for them. Not much else in life can give a man confidence competence and grounding than knowing how to pick up his tools and get to work. 

 

The internet is a good reference, but take much of what youtube experts tell you with a grain of sand. It may not work for you, and in reality, you have no idea if these people really know what the hell they're talking about. Seek out the ones you know are competent, and ask for help. Most of them are more than happy to take someone under their wing and offer a little mentoring and advice. My neighbor and now best friend is a high ranking police officer in a big city near me. Hell of a cop, but confused by which end of a hammer hits a nail. It has been my great pleasure to put tools in his hands, teach him to use them, and watch him get after things that just a few years ago, he would have never attempted on his own. 






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