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#41 Ryan

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 04:14 PM

This is higher dollar but for bug out type situations I like how light it is and how it can be used as a demolition tool as well. I haven't made the plunge as it's a bit expensive for a hatchet that will most likely just be used as an axe/hammer at the camp sight

Gerber down range tomahawk

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#42 Ryan

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 06:48 PM

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This is what I currently have in my bug out bag. All the same ability as the gerber but not as good of hammer or as much leverage for prying. I have used it several times camping and it works great for making kindling and pounding tent stakes. The handle is incredibly uncomfortable so I recently made this paracord wrapped handle. Now it won't fit in its sheath but that's okay as the sheath was JUNK; pretty disappointed in ka-bar there. Since joining this sight I have given serious thought to getting into leather making and making a sheath for it.

#43 chorpie

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 01:07 PM

If you're looking for portable, a $20 Cold Steel tomahawk will come with an 18" handle and be much more comfortable for chopping than a paracord wrapped metal handle will be. That, and you can slide the head off the handle (or fashion a new handle if yours breaks) if you need a smaller sized tool for fine work.



#44 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:47 PM

Don't have the money for a GB, but I just bought a Hudson Bay 18' Handle and also the Boys axe with 28" ( I think thats the size) from council tool. One is for my dad, probably the hudson bay, fits his needs more. I've read a ton on those and it appears to be a good value, no money for the velvicut, lol. However, for a bugout bag, if I wasn't packing something like the Hudson bay, a good hatchet would be nice. I picked up an antique Plumb Boyscout hatchet and made a new handle out of it and I love it, holds an edge nicely. I put a little bit thicker and longer handle on it, also made a straight handle.


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#45 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 06 July 2017 - 11:24 AM

My Plumb Boyscout with the handle I madeAttached File  IMG_20170419_123744936.jpg   138.41KB   0 downloads

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#46 coldwater

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 05:30 PM

Check out the Huskvarna axes.


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#47 Ephie

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 08:21 AM

I am a complete novice when it comes to axes but having bought a home in a wooded area with two wood burning stoves I am looking to educate myself.  I foresee myself primarily using an axe to cut firewood. 

I found this You Tube video,

which offers some very simple tips, I found useful for someone completely new to handling an axe such as myself.

Its expensive but I have been eyeing the Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe for a while now, I am thinking of just going ahead an buying it already.  From all that I have read, with proper care, it will pay for itself in years of use.



#48 coldwater

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 04:58 PM

I am a complete novice when it comes to axes but having bought a home in a wooded area with two wood burning stoves I am looking to educate myself.  I foresee myself primarily using an axe to cut firewood. 

I found this You Tube video,

which offers some very simple tips, I found useful for someone completely new to handling an axe such as myself.

Its expensive but I have been eyeing the Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe for a while now, I am thinking of just going ahead an buying it already.  From all that I have read, with proper care, it will pay for itself in years of use.

 

If I may make a suggestion, you can save a lot of money by picking up one of the outstanding Husqvarna axes at a fraction of the price. It's made by the same people in the same forge, but not taken to the high level of finish. A couple of hours on a a puck and a bottle of oil will result in a razor sharp axe anyone would be proud to own. I own a few old Collinsville axes that were properly forged and tempered, and they are as god as it gets as a cutting tool, but they have taken a back seat to my Husq's.



#49 Ephie

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Posted 16 October 2017 - 10:18 PM

I am always welcoming of a suggestion coldwater, that’s why I post here. I will certainly look into the Husqvarna.
Although I am wary of the the idea of sharpening on a puck for a material amount of time. I have zero experience doing that and just got comfortable sharpening knives. Of course it is something I am going to have to learn eventually.
Thanks for the advice.



#50 Ephie

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Posted 17 October 2017 - 10:36 AM

As I continue to educate myself on axes, as usual I find YouTube to be a great resource.

I enjoy the Wranglerstar site for a variety of things and am finding the axe sharpening videos very educational

https://www.youtube....=axe sharpening



#51 coldwater

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 05:30 PM

There is very little to pucking  an axe. It's not at all like sharpening a knife, and it's hard to mess up. I enjoy doing it myself and reprofiling the bit to my liking. I sit at the bench with the axe, a puck, and a few cold beers and get to it.



#52 Ephie

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Posted 21 October 2017 - 08:07 AM

Thanks Coldwater, that actually sounds like a very relaxing way to spend an afternoon.

#53 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 12:22 PM

There is very little to pucking  an axe. It's not at all like sharpening a knife, and it's hard to mess up. I enjoy doing it myself and reprofiling the bit to my liking. I sit at the bench with the axe, a puck, and a few cold beers and get to it.

Ive yet to buy a puck, they look nice to use. I just put it in a vice, hit the bit with a file, then refine with a regular combo stone. Occasionally, although not necessary, Ill work it on the soft arky.


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#54 coldwater

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Posted 31 October 2017 - 03:55 PM

I never go near my axes with a file, it kills them. Pucks have 2 sides, one coarse and one fine. I keep mine in a little tub of air tool oil so it's soaked right through. It removes material pretty quickly and at a controlled rate, all the while keeping a good profile down the length of the cutting bit. I keep a big black magic marker with ti so I can color the bit as I puck it out. I let's me know where I am all the time. The smooth side will polish it like a mirror and put a razor edge on it. I keep mine shaving sharp.


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#55 Ephie

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Posted 06 December 2017 - 11:39 AM

I went ahead and purchased a Gransfors Bruks Small Forest Axe.  I guess these things truly are popular because everywhere I looked they were on back order.  Most places could not give an estimate as to when they would have any available.  I ended up coming across a site in Canada that said they expected orders to be filled by 12/15, so I ordered from them.  Who knows?  Hopefully I do not need to wait too long.



#56 Ephie

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Posted 07 December 2017 - 02:29 PM

I have been looking for books to educate myself on wood chopping and other aspects of processing wood in preparation for use in a wood stove.

During my research I heard recommendations  for The Axe Book by Dudley Cook

https://www.amazon.c...79HFN0MH5TEW0JS

but while looking that up on Amazon I came across a book called Norwegian Wood:  Chopping, Stacking, and Drying Wood the Scandinavian Way by Lars Mytting

https://www.amazon.c...9G1GYV7CG9B61TC

As I scanned some of the content of this book it really appealed to me, so I ordered it.  I have not received it yet but I am looking forward to reading it.

 

#57 Ephie

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 10:14 AM

I received my Gransfors Bruks Small Forest axe.  Again, I am no axe expert, quite the opposite, but the feel of the axe in my hand and the very obvious workmanship, down to the leather sheath, has made me pleased with my purchase so far.  I will give it a test this weekend as I have to cut some wood down to size for a wood stove.

As many of the reviews I have read stated, the axe was delivered shaving sharp.

I noticed that unlike some older videos I've seen of the axe, they no longer put a metal wedge in the head.  They explain the change on their site https://www.gransfor...product-change/

As I had mentioned previously, the axe was out of stock on most sites I searched, with no specific date as to when they may get them in.  As I searched further I came across a company called The Canadian Outdoor Equipment Co.

https://www.canadian...orequipment.com

and I am extremely happy that I did.  Firstly, while they to were out of stock, they had a specific date that a new shipment was arriving.  The date ended up being off by just a day because the shipment was held up in customs.  Secondly, their customer service is excellent.  Every time I called to check on the status of my order an actual person answered the phone and was able to immediately pull up my information and a real time status report on the order.  Thirdly, and most importantly, given the exchange rate between the U.S. and Canada, I was able to purchase the axe considerably cheaper than any domestic price I found, plus the shipping was free.  The axe cost C$159.00, which worked out to $129.61 (actually, as of this morning,  at today's rate it works out to $125.16).

I will definitely be looking to buy additional outdoor gear from Canadian Outdoor Equipment.






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