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Question about sharpening a Scandi grind


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#1 Ephie

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Posted 19 October 2017 - 01:36 PM

I have a Mora Bushcraft Black, which I am very happy with and which has held its edge very well 

https://morakniv.se/...ushcraft-black/

However I am getting towards the point where it is going to need a bit of a tuneup with regards to sharpening.  I am still a novice when it comes to sharpening and have started myself off with the the Work Sharp Guided Field Sharpener, which I love. 

http://www.worksharp...-sharpener.html

The built in guides helped me get over my intimidation over maintaining the correct angle and the portability encourages me to sharpen more because I can do it virtually anywhere.

My question is whether the 20 degree angle that is preset on this guide is appropriate for a Scandi grind, or, as I have seen on some videos, should I just use a sharpening stone and use the bevel on the knife blade as my guide.

Thanks.



#2 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 01:19 AM

Coming from a freehand guy, I believe a scandi would be easier on a stone. Just lay on the bevels and push or drag.

I've never used a guided system, but from the looks it could be difficult to get that angle right. A lot guys have those systems though so I hope someone can help you

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#3 Ephie

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 05:19 PM

Thanks KlaudeMarks, from all that I have watched on YouTube, I think I will go the freehand stone route and rely on the Scandi bevel to be my guide.
Is there a particular brand of stone you would recommend? Grit level?
Thanks.

P.S
Some of the videoes I’ve been watching


https://youtu.be/262ZrxulO38

#4 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 20 October 2017 - 11:22 PM

I'm a firm believer in that a lot of stones on the market are overkill, for getting a nice working edge...on that note, I respect the hobbyist who like to do the polished edges and what not. I use a combo aluminum oxide stone, just a cheap one from the hardware store, but a norton india stone is a very well regarded artificial stone. If I dont get the edge i desire off of the two sides on the AO stone, I go to my soft arkansas stone (8x2) from Dans Whetstone. If you go the arkansas stone route, Dans is well regarded, but really, theyre all decent. 


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#5 Ephie

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Posted 22 October 2017 - 09:03 AM

Thanks for the advice KlaudeMarks.
I don’t know why I find knife sharpening so intimidating. I think part of the reason is that the more I have read up on it the more I learn about the skill involved, the critical importance of maintaining a consistent angle, different grits, and how even a wrong strop finish can undo a good edge. It’s also that I strongly believe in taking good care of your tools so they last (I have Wusthof knives in my kitchen that have seen daily use for over 20 years and look like they will clearly outlive me) and I would really be upset with myself if I ruined a blade.
Unfortunately there is only so much you can learn from reading and watching YouTube. You need a hands on lesson.
My father never sharpened knives and while New York City offer classes in just about anything, knife sharpening is rare. There is one maker of hand made Japanese knives that has classes but they are so popular they are often booked in adavance and it is not hands on, just a demo.

#6 KlaudeMarks

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Posted 23 October 2017 - 11:12 PM

I have an article I posted in the knife thread on knife sharpening, well actually honing. I felt the same way as you when I go into the sharpening world, and after awhile, I realized a lot of the information is overrated. Stropping is very easy, and yes, you could undo a nice edge, it's an easy fix by going back to one of your stones.There is a lot of talk on grits and finishes, but really, you don't need much to get an edge that works and pops hairs. I can do the wife's kitchen knives with the combo stone and finish it off with the steel rod. Practice on the old knives you have, use a sharpie along the edge if you have to so you can keep a consistent angle, and just practice. Grits help you get to where you want to go faster. You can, in theory, achieve any edge you like with any stone (or so I've heard), the key is in the time spent on the stones. 

 

https://medium.com/@...ns-df51acdb139a


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#7 Ephie

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Posted 24 October 2017 - 08:21 AM

I have an article I posted in the knife thread on knife sharpening, well actually honing. I felt the same way as you when I go into the sharpening world, and after awhile, I realized a lot of the information is overrated. Stropping is very easy, and yes, you could undo a nice edge, it's an easy fix by going back to one of your stones.There is a lot of talk on grits and finishes, but really, you don't need much to get an edge that works and pops hairs. I can do the wife's kitchen knives with the combo stone and finish it off with the steel rod. Practice on the old knives you have, use a sharpie along the edge if you have to so you can keep a consistent angle, and just practice. Grits help you get to where you want to go faster. You can, in theory, achieve any edge you like with any stone (or so I've heard), the key is in the time spent on the stones. 

 

https://medium.com/@...ns-df51acdb139a

Thank you.  That is great perspective, I appreciate all of your advice.






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