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Remington 870 or Mossberg 500?


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#1 TK

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 08:23 AM

I'm looking to buy a shotgun next months and I'm trying to choose between those two. I'm just looking for some input from anyone who may own either or both. I want a shotgun that I can build up later on but is still solid stock. Ive narrowed it down between the 870 and 500 and they seem very similar at this point so let me know what you guys think about them both. Thanks!

#2 armydoc

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 11:56 AM

TK,

 

What are you looking to build up the shotgun for, self defense?

 

The 870 has a very long and rich history, I believe the first one that rolled of the line was given to president Truman. I have not owned an 870 but their reputation as one of the finest shotgun out there in not often debated. I have owned a Mossberg 590 Mariner. It was a 9 round (8+1) defensive shotgun. It did seem to recoil quite harshly as I recall.

 

One of the main differences between Remington and Mossberg was the receiver. The Remington was steel and the Mossberg 500 series had an aluminum one.

 

They both come with a multitude of aftermarket options and accessories and options.

 

What options were you looking to add to the weapon?

 

Have you ever heard of Benelli? I have owned a Benelli as well and I can tell you without reservation it is without a doubt one of the finest weapons I have ever owned. Mine was an M1 Super 90 autoloader it was defense oriented.

 

Benelli makes pump action defensive shotgun called the Supernova Tactical. I find it to be superior to both the 870 and Mossberg 500 series in every way.

 

The Supernova will allow you to fire ANY 12 gauge shell on the planet up to 3 1/2 inch magnums rounds. That aspect alone carries a lot of appeal for preppers.

 

It also has the ability to change out a round loaded in the chamber WITHOUT having to cycle a round causing another round to drop down in case you need to change from buckshot to a slug.

 

Options for the weapon include collapsible stock, bolt on side saddle shell carrier/picatinny rail to mount optics, mag tube extension, side picatinny rail to mount a light or laser, you can also get the weapon I believe in a nickel Teflon coating allowing it to be more weatherproofed. You can also purchase hunting barrels for any of the shotguns in question, giving you a weapon that now is even more diverse.

 

The weapon is also extremely light compared to your standard shotgun as it uses polymer in its design. The recoil is not however severe from what I have seen with people shooting it.

 

You can find a Benelli Supernova Tactical with ghost ring sights for $450.00 well within the price range of either a Mossberg or Remington.

 

Try and keep in mind you want to have the cleanest profile you can have with your weapon as everything hanging off of the firearm is just something else to get snagged on which could be fatal in a real life situation.

 

In closing I would suggest a Benelli, then Remington and finally Mossberg in that order.

 

20953-DEFAULT-L.jpg

 

Benelli Supernova Tactical with ghost ring sights

 

 

https://www.youtube....B6A51E&index=11 Clint Smith Thunder Ranch talks about shotgun simplicity.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=KdW2TAfN3mQ Clint Smith on the Remington 870

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=OqBS0ZnJ05A Supernova and Supernova Tactical demo.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=RW6-4WJrbyg Detailed review of the Supernova Tactical by Mrgunsngear

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=1XCv0X6SqUg Magpul Art of The Dynamic Shotgun Intro Instructional program on everything you need to know about using a shotgun for defense from ammunition options, reloading and tactics.

 

https://www.magpul.c...oducts/closeout Dynamic Shotgun quick link $6.99 closeout price



#3 coldwater

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 01:18 PM

Between the two, The Mossberg 500 is an absolutely legendary performer. I think I have 3 of them, I know one is 30 years old and used to live behind the seat of my ranch truck. If you're interested in a tougher duty / higher cost "tactical" (that word sickens me) Shotty, I can highly recommend the Mossberg 590 A-1. 

Pound for pound and buck for buck, you're going to have a hard time beating a 500. Baseball bat simple and just as tough.


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#4 Paul Taegel

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 03:03 PM

I own an 870 and would recommend it categorically over the Mossberg. I compared them side by side, and the Remington was clearly the better designed and built. I also have a Remington 1100 for shooting birds. Exceptional gun.

That being said, "armydoc" makes a pretty strong case for the Benelli. I've been out with guys who hunt with the Super Sports and, quite frankly, would love to own one. Benelli has a very very strong reputation.

#5 coldwater

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 04:19 PM

I like my OLD 870, but they have had a reputation for feed jams and broken ejectors in recent years. My statement taking the 500 over the 870 (his 2 choices) was because out of any gun I own, the 500's have been the most terribly abused, and absolutely reliable at a bargain price. Can't comment on the Benelli because I don't own one and have never had one in hand. Of the shotguns I own, only 2 will never be for sale. An old Beretta S-56E, and that 590-A1. 



#6 Dan Post

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 04:21 PM

I love my 870. I know people who own the Mossberg 500, and I like mine much more. I personally like the feel and action better. However, both are great, classic shotguns. It's a preference in my opinion, just like with knives and other gear.

#7 Matt

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 04:52 PM

@TK - what is your budget?  What is your primary use-case for the shotgun?  Is it just another to add to the collection, or is it your first or second?

 

My only shotgun is a Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon I, that I use for Trap league and for pheasant hunting.  Long-term I'll be in the market for another, likely as a home-defence option when I move further from the city, so I'm curious if the input you'll get here will be useful for me as well.


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#8 armydoc

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 06:25 PM

Keiichi

 

If you are sweet on Beretta for a defensive shotgun they make a semi-automatic shotgun with their "Blink" system. It is marketed as the fastest cycling shotgun out there and the recoil is extremely soft. The Blink system was originally design for trap and skeet shooting if I recall correctly.

 

The following from their website:

 

"The integrated BLINK gas operating system, featuring a cross tube gas piston, allows the 1301 Tactical to cycle 36% faster than any other shotgun on the market. This also makes it ideal for three-gun tactical competitions: when shooting the 1301 Tactical, you will simply and objectively have an edge over your competitors. And regardless of the use, with a 1301 Tactical you will always know that you have the best of Beretta to rely upon—with its unmatched 500 years of experience, passion and know-how."

 

 

3a4ad56b29dab2924e4a66157400142f.jpg

 

 

 

http://www.beretta.c.../1301-tactical/ Link to the model 1301 Tactical

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=FdtHsDhHf9s 1301 Review by JeremyS


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#9 coldwater

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 06:53 AM

@TK - what is your budget?  What is your primary use-case for the shotgun?  Is it just another to add to the collection, or is it your first or second?

 

My only shotgun is a Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon I, that I use for Trap league and for pheasant hunting.  Long-term I'll be in the market for another, likely as a home-defence option when I move further from the city, so I'm curious if the input you'll get here will be useful for me as well.

Considering the original post of being between entry level quality shotguns that are in the $300 range, I can't imagine he would be looking into a $1,300 to $2,500 model. 

This is the best post so far, as it ass the right question at the right time. Budgettm and target for use. Unless he's going to be shooting at a high level competition, high end defensive auto loaders may not be a good choice. If it's a good old dog that followed me home shotgun he's looking for, that will serve as home defense or go afield, his choices between the two he posted are good. I suggest he try and find a way to shoot both, speak personally to the owners, and go from there. Aside from personal, hands on experience with a gun, I generally stay away from giving my opinions on what anyone should buy. Example: Glock is the most recommended pistol on earth, and they have an almost cult like following. Fine hand gun, but I can't shoot one worth a damned because of the odd grip angle. All I can advise on, is the reliability and adaptability of what I own and shoot. 

Funny story. Years ago, one of the ranges I used to belong to held an annual gun show where at least 10 major manufacturers used to come with everything they had, and you could shoot them for a couple bucks. They also brought in some of the best competition shooters in the US to show off their skills. During an open shotgun fun shoot, Mossberg had one of the shooters take a stock 500 out of an off the line new box and put it to use. He shot a nearly perfect score with it. In the hands of an expert, any gun is good, and I'm sure it could have been done with any shotgun. My criteria for buying any gun is a short 2 part list. Does it fit and point naturally, and is it reliable. It's my job to make it hit. 


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#10 Brian

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 09:09 AM

I like the layout of the ambidextrous safety on the Mossberg 500.  The 500 Flex is a very versatile shotgun. Cabella's has a Mossberg FLEX 500 Home & Field Tactical Pump-Action Shotgun Combo for $499.99.  This shotgun comes with both  a standard stock, and a pistol grip.  It also has a 28" hunting barrel and a 18" cylinder bore barrel.  So, right out of the box, you have a hunting gun that can convert in a few seconds to a home defense gun that is easy to hide and maneuver for home defense.  Hard to beat at that particular price point.


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#11 armydoc

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Posted 26 March 2016 - 09:27 AM

Coldwater,

 

I posted the Beretta 1301 Tactical model for the benefit of Keiichi since he said he liked Beretta, not TK. It is hard to not like Beretta when you have a family owned business that is 500 years old and made firearms for Napoleon.

 

While there are some semi-automatic models that are collaborations with Benelli that have a price point that put it in the realm of an 870 or 500, I only posted the Supernova Tactical as it is a viable alternative to either the 870 or 500 series and because it is a pump action.

 

The Remington 870 started production in 1951 and the Mossberg 500 in 1960. While they're still being produced today is a testament to the design, nothing has really changed all that much from the original ones that rolled off the production line so many decades ago.

 

That is why I am big proponent of the Supernova Tactical. It has a tremendous pedigree from one of the finest shotgun makers in the world, modern design incorporating technology of today in contrast to designs that are 60 to 70 years old. Technology and designs have improved since then.

 

With that said I would not feel outgunned, or outclassed, carrying an 870 or 500.

 

I actually came across of a direct review/comparison of the 870 VS the 590 by a much respected online reviewer Hicock 45. https://www.youtube....h?v=6vaa6wsw7Ts


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#12 DB Cooper

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Posted 04 April 2016 - 01:22 PM

I own an 870 and a Super Nova. The Benelli is a better gun, fit, finish, handling, ability to shoot anything you feed it, easy to clean, and dead reliable.

 

The Remington has two things in it's favor, it's cheaper, and there is a ton of aftermarket parts for it that are not only more abundant, but cheaper as well.

 

If you plan on adding or customizing your shotgun, the Remington may be the better choice for you. If you have a couple more bucks and plan it leave it pretty much as-is (or pay a bit more to accessorize it). The Benelli is certainly worth the extra money


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#13 armydoc

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Posted 05 April 2016 - 01:02 AM

If you plan on adding or customizing your shotgun, the Remington may be the better choice for you. If you have a couple more bucks and plan it leave it pretty much as-is (or pay a bit more to accessorize it). The Benelli is certainly worth the extra money

 

I have researched the aftermarket add ons for the Supernova and Benelli makes a mag tube extension, various stocks including a collapsible stock. There is a side saddle shell holder with a picatinny rail for optics, and picatinny rails for adding a light or laser to the front of the weapon, tritium ghost ring sights, fiber optic sights, etc.. The ONLY thing that cannot be changed out is the forend as that has the built in button that allows you to swap out chambered rounds without activating the magazine tube release allowing for another shell to drop down.

 

If aftermarket add ons are a consideration in a firearms purchase the difference with the Supernova in contrast to 500 or 870 is that you might have 7 companies that make a magazine tube extension for the 500 and 870 versus only 2 companies for the Benelli. You will not have a problem finding accessories for the Supernova I assure you.

 

SuperNova_2.jpg

152435433.jpg41%2Bi5TPUwFL.jpg



#14 jacksbuddy

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Posted 19 September 2016 - 09:41 AM

I'm looking to buy a shotgun next months and I'm trying to choose between those two. I'm just looking for some input from anyone who may own either or both. I want a shotgun that I can build up later on but is still solid stock. Ive narrowed it down between the 870 and 500 and they seem very similar at this point so let me know what you guys think about them both. Thanks!

Since you've narrowed it down to these two, my suggestion is that you go with the Mossberg 500.  It ain't pretty, but it is simple to operate, easy to maintain and fix in the field if needed, tough as nails, dependable, accurate, and less expensive than the 870.

 

I've shot both.  I own a 500.  I have no problem taking the 500 out to a duck hole with no worries.  Think about it.  What would you do if you were to drop something into 3 feet of muddy ice water in January?  Could you fish it out and use it again after just giving it a good once over and wipe down?  (I know, that probably isn't an issue for you, but it is for guys like me who live along the Mississippi Flyway.)  Have fun with whichever you decide.



#15 Christopher Clagg

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 07:36 PM

Personally I have a 500 a 590 & an old Ithaca 37.
I suggest the 500 as you can usually find them as a combo with both a vent rib hunting barrel, 18 1/2 defense barrel and for $100-$150 a black powder add on kit. My 590 holds more self defense rounds and the Ithaca is from the 1960's police trade-in that I bought from the agency I retired from 3-4K rounds fired & just a little bluing wear from the car lock. Saved me a few times and accurate, reliable & nearly indestructible tried a few times.
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#16 John

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 05:50 AM

Both will absolutely do whatever job you throw at them! The Mossberg will just do it less expensively. I've owned a 500 for almost 25 years; it was my duty shotgun for ten of those when I wore a badge that said "Police" (our department wasn't rich and allowed personal weapons). After that it worked many security assignments and many more camping and travel trips. It currently lives in my closet like it always has - loaded tube, empty chamber and I trust it fully to protect my family and I like it has all these years. I guess I can't give a better recommendation than that.

#17 Donny

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Posted 06 December 2016 - 04:05 PM

I have Remington 870, Mossberg 500, and Maverick (made by Mossberg) 88. My Maverick is my favorite and everyday car gun. Never failed me. I've run thousands of rounds thru it over the years. Any of them would work just fine. They are all good shotguns.



#18 Mike Blum

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 11:52 AM

I've used Remington, Mossberg pump shotguns, Benelli, Beretta semi-auto shotguns. The Benelli and Beretta for sport shooting and the Rem and Moss for defensive, military uses.

 

The Remington and Mossberg are both fine for defensive use. The Remington may have nicer fit, finish etc but the Mossberg is a bit more ergonomic. Both are very reliable. The best of the defensive, LE or military guns are the Remington Special Police and the Mossberg 590 series.

 

I like the Beretta's gas system(softer recoil than the Benelli for the same gauge), the fit and finish are a bit better than the Benelli. The Benelli recoil system is easy to clean, but it has more felt recoil than the Beretta for the same gauge.

 

I have experienced extractor failure on the Benelli due to the high round count on the guns I used, ( more than 10,000 rounds on some of the guns). Replacing the extractor is easy if you have a roll pin punch and the correct extractor and roll pin for the bolt.

 

One must be familiar with the shotgun they choose and maintain it properly most of the reliability comes from the owner's care of the gun.

 

You may experience extractor failure on the Remington pump versions if you lubricate the extractor plunger and spring. I found this out the hard way. If you have spares for these parts they are easy to replace.This is not normally an issue with the Mossberg.

 

Both Rem and Moss are easy to field strip for cleaning and lubrication as are the Beretta and Benelli.

 

I own a Remington because it was already set up for defensive use and the price was right. I own a Benelli because it was a gift.



#19 Chase

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 02:32 PM

Both are solid shotguns.  I have owned and rely on my 870 for home defense.  I used Mossberg 500's back in my Navy days.  While i like the location of the safety on them, i broke three 500's in my 5 year enlistment.  However, take that into consideration with the assumption that each of those service shotguns undoubtedly had "high mileage" on them.  The breakage I experienced with the 500's were a malfunctioning safety switch (couldn't re-engage), and two different shotguns failed to cycle or reset the trigger without slamming back the action as hard as you can.  That malfunction is a scary one to have in a defensive situation.  Anyone else experience these issues or am I just special?



#20 Mike Blum

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 08:30 AM

I have heard of safety slider issues on the Mossbergs but replacing the safety with a steel version (the factory standard safety is plastic), will solve that issue. I carried a Mossberg 12ga while in Iraq and it was very reliable. No problems such as those just mentioned. 

  I field stripped the gun when it was issued and checked it thoroughly, lubed it, ( it had not been lubed at all...bone dry), and ran some buckshot through it.

I did field strip, clean and lube the gun every chance I got because the environment in Iraq was very dusty.


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