Jump to content

Logo

Today's Active Posts

Photo
- - - - -

Which lubricant for your Leatherman or other multi-tool?


27 replies to this topic

#1 Ephie

Ephie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 174 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 25 September 2015 - 09:11 PM

RIG + P, Ballistol, any others? I am curious which lubricant you prefer when servicing your multi-tool. Is WD-40 as bad as I have read (attracting dust and grit?).
Thanks for any comments.

#2 RichMiller

RichMiller

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 26 September 2015 - 06:34 AM

wd4  isnt a lubricant anyway, it's a cleaner.



#3 Ephie

Ephie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 174 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 26 September 2015 - 09:12 AM

Thanks. I did not realize that until I started to read more about it. On the Leatherman website under maintenance they recommend WD-40
"After cleaning, re-oil pivoting areas with a light machine or penetrating type oil (such as WD-40). Buff stained surfaces with a polishing cloth or non-metallic abrasive (e.g., Scotchbrite pad or soft bristle brush)."
https://www.leatherm...aintenance.html

#4 Shaun D

Shaun D

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 236 posts
  • LocationI come from a land down under

Posted 26 September 2015 - 09:41 AM

WD40 is funny stuff...its a penetrating oil that contains some non-volatile lubricating compounds unlike almost all other forms of penetrating oils.

 

All of my knives and multitools get the same treatment once a year (or when im bored)

 

  1. Sharpness test to see if they could do with a sharpen
  2. Disassembly
  3. Spray all parts with WD40 or Penetrene
  4. Light coating of oil (at the moment im using a light mineral oil called Shell TurboT46 that is left over from my power station days)
  5. All screws get a very light coating of nickel grease
  6. All rubbing surfaces get a slightly thicker coating of mineral oil
  7. Reassembly
  8. Sharpen
  9. Clean oil off knife surfaces and handles

Anything you cover in a slightly sticky surface will appear attract dirt and dust, while we don't normally think of oil or lubricant being "sticky" it is in this case.


  • Ben likes this

#5 kyle

kyle

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 26 September 2015 - 09:50 PM

I use WD 40 to clean my multi tools, then usually re oil with a 3-in-1 lubricant. This is availible at pretty much every hardware store. There is actually a brand called 3-in-1, but any lube similare to this is usable.

#6 RichMiller

RichMiller

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 19 October 2015 - 12:50 PM

how does a sharpness test work?

 

genuine question. what do you test it against or how do you set the standard? what should your daily carry blade be able to handle?



#7 Griffen Kociela

Griffen Kociela

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 245 posts
  • LocationSpokane, WA

Posted 19 October 2015 - 01:37 PM

I usually use a drop of three-in-one or hoppe's gun oil on the pivot surfaces of my knives and multi-tools when needed. 

 

how does a sharpness test work?

 

genuine question. what do you test it against or how do you set the standard? what should your daily carry blade be able to handle?

A lot of people use the paper test for edc knives. If your knife can cut easily and cleanly through a sheet of paper, it is probably sharp enough for most edc tasks. Most people have their own preference on how sharp their knives should be. For me, if my knife cuts paper easily, it is sharp enough, but I would prefer that it is sharp enough to cut an s curve through a piece of paper without ripping it. I think that the sharper your blade is, the more effective, useful, and safe it will be, but the sharpness of a knife and how sharp it can get also depends on factors such as blade shape, edge geometry, and steel type. If your blade is thick behind the edge, it is harder to get it to a good slicing sharpness than a blade that is very thin behind the edge. A steel with a more coarse grain structure also makes it harder to achieve a sharp, fine edge than a steel with a very fine and uniform grain structure. So in other words, sharpness depends on the particular blade and your personal preference, but generally, sharper is better.



#8 Nathaniel P

Nathaniel P

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 368 posts
  • LocationTexas

Posted 19 October 2015 - 01:44 PM

how does a sharpness test work?

 

genuine question. what do you test it against or how do you set the standard? what should your daily carry blade be able to handle?

See this topic on how to test sharpness:

http://forum.everyda...ness-of-knives/

 

Personally, if my knife can cut phonebook, it is plenty sharp for me. However, it depends entirely on what you use your knives for.


  • Ben likes this

#9 Andrew Cohen

Andrew Cohen

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 167 posts
  • LocationMonterey/Santa Cruz border, California

Posted 20 October 2015 - 12:34 AM

Folks at Kershaw told me Break Free was a good choice, so that is what I have used. That, a q-tip and a rag for cleaning off any excess and things are ready to go again.

 

wd4  isnt a lubricant anyway, it's a cleaner.

I'm curious, why do you say it is not a lubricant? It is, according to what I have read, a light lubricant as well as a cleaner/preservative, etc. I have used it for years and found it works as a lubricant. Not as well as some things in different applications, but it has served well in some instances. 



#10 Ephie

Ephie

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 174 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 20 October 2015 - 09:03 AM

My Leatherman Surge got pretty mucked up during a week long fishing trip, there was a bit of rust and stiffness.  

I sprayed it down pretty heavily with Ballistol and kept it in a ziploc for a day.  That removed some of the rust.  After wiping it down and using a toothbrush on the joints I applied RIG + P to the joints with a Q-tip.  The process made a huge difference and everything is working very smoothly.  Finally I used a Super Eraser rust eraser on some stubborn rust spots on the blade, which were gone after a few rubs. 



#11 RichMiller

RichMiller

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 20 October 2015 - 03:34 PM

Folks at Kershaw told me Break Free was a good choice, so that is what I have used. That, a q-tip and a rag for cleaning off any excess and things are ready to go again.
 

I'm curious, why do you say it is not a lubricant? It is, according to what I have read, a light lubricant as well as a cleaner/preservative, etc. I have used it for years and found it works as a lubricant. Not as well as some things in different applications, but it has served well in some instances.


It is primarily designed as a cleaner to clean out what causes the squeaks etc that a lubricant cures. It lubricates to an extent but no where near as well as an actual lube.

#12 David E

David E

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 88 posts

Posted 20 October 2015 - 10:30 PM

WD40 is funny stuff...its a penetrating oil that contains some non-volatile lubricating compounds unlike almost all other forms of penetrating oils.

 

All of my knives and multitools get the same treatment once a year (or when im bored)

 

  1. Sharpness test to see if they could do with a sharpen
  2. Disassembly
  3. Spray all parts with WD40 or Penetrene
  4. Light coating of oil (at the moment im using a light mineral oil called Shell TurboT46 that is left over from my power station days)
  5. All screws get a very light coating of nickel grease
  6. All rubbing surfaces get a slightly thicker coating of mineral oil
  7. Reassembly
  8. Sharpen
  9. Clean oil off knife surfaces and handles

Anything you cover in a slightly sticky surface will appear attract dirt and dust, while we don't normally think of oil or lubricant being "sticky" it is in this case.

Do you sleep?


  • Griffen Kociela, Shaun D, Andrew Cohen and 1 other like this

#13 Tom Magnum

Tom Magnum

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 21 October 2015 - 01:36 AM

I like "TUF-GLIDE" with the needle applicator. You can get it in all the tight places.. plus it's made for knives.



#14 Shaun D

Shaun D

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 236 posts
  • LocationI come from a land down under

Posted 21 October 2015 - 05:00 AM

Do you sleep?

 

Ive been a shift worker for the last 11 years...sleep (unless on days off) pretty much guarantees work.


  • Ben likes this

#15 coldwater

coldwater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1312 posts

Posted 25 October 2015 - 08:22 AM

I avoid WD 40 like the plague. Frog lube on everything. 


  • Brendan likes this

#16 Harshit Gupta

Harshit Gupta

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 153 posts

Posted 27 October 2015 - 12:55 AM

I think that WD-40 Lubricates, Cleans, Protects, Penetrates & Displaces Moisture knives and other multitool. I use it for my leatherman multi tool as well.


When you think of something, Go for it.......

Love to Carry victorinox trekking Knives and leatherman multitools for outdoors survival.

 


#17 Andrew Curtis

Andrew Curtis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 62 posts
  • LocationMilford Haven

Posted 27 October 2015 - 12:58 PM

Folks at Kershaw told me Break Free was a good choice, so that is what I have used. That, a q-tip and a rag for cleaning off any excess and things are ready to go again.

 

I'm curious, why do you say it is not a lubricant? It is, according to what I have read, a light lubricant as well as a cleaner/preservative, etc. I have used it for years and found it works as a lubricant. Not as well as some things in different applications, but it has served well in some instances. 

I used to work at a place that manufactured windows.  When I suggested using WD-40 to free a stuck hinge the old hands all shook their heads and then took turns to lecture me.  It's a solvent, not a lubricant.  Has lots of uses, and may be okay on knives, but it will eventually ruin your window hinges.  Apparently.

 

My Gerber Dime is fairly new, and most tasks so far have been office-based, so I haven't used anything.  But when I do lubricate it I'll be using the 3-in-1 stuff my old man always uses.



#18 Stupendous Walrus

Stupendous Walrus

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2498 posts

Posted 08 November 2015 - 02:36 PM

FROG. LUBE.


  • Brendan likes this

#19 shmevro

shmevro

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 04 March 2016 - 02:36 PM

I consider WD40 like the multitool of lubricants. Sure it lubricates, penetrates & cleans etc. But it's probably never going to be as good as a chemical designed for the task. Much the same way my leatherman is never going to be as good as my best set of pliers.
  • coldwater likes this

#20 coldwater

coldwater

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1312 posts

Posted 04 March 2016 - 02:57 PM

I consider WD40 like the multitool of lubricants. Sure it lubricates, penetrates & cleans etc. But it's probably never going to be as good as a chemical designed for the task. Much the same way my leatherman is never going to be as good as my best set of pliers.

Yeah…I'm not sure what the hell you actually use WD40 for. I keep it around, but honestly as far as I can tell, it's nearly worthless as a lubricant. Best uses I have found is that it somewhat displaces moisture, and it's a first rate adhesive remover, but that's about it.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users