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Minimalist FAK

fak minimalist

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#21 Jambon

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Posted 23 January 2015 - 03:04 AM

If you have a penetrative trauma wound that is large enough to require packing you require emergency medical attention. Carry a charged phone to call for help. Apply direct pressure and when appropriate binding. Chest wounds require Chest seals. If you need to carry something to pack and stop a catastrophic bleed then get some celox gauze. Carry the tampons however as they are great for starting fires. 


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#22 Craig P Brown

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Posted 10 February 2015 - 08:16 AM

Thanks for all the tips team.  I saw an EDC FAK on the Urban Prepper Youtube channel last night.

 

I never would have thought about carrying one but I had a flash back to when my little girl tripped and grazed her knee and palm.  Luckily we where at my wives place of work and she had a first aid kit.  But then it hit me, what would I have done if we where out for the day or in the middle of nowhere.

 

I think this is now a must.

Craig


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#23 Stupendous Walrus

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 05:56 PM

At the very least, it takes virtually no space and adds no discernable weight to your wallet just to throw some bandaids in there.
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#24 Duff72

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Posted 16 February 2015 - 10:05 PM

Thanks for all the tips team. I saw an EDC FAK on the Urban Prepper Youtube channel last night.

I never would have thought about carrying one but I had a flash back to when my little girl tripped and grazed her knee and palm. Luckily we where at my wives place of work and she had a first aid kit. But then it hit me, what would I have done if we where out for the day or in the middle of nowhere.

I think this is now a must.




Craig

As a father of 2 girls I must inform you it is your duty to carry at least a 10 bandaid assortment (hello kitty, my little pony, strawberry shortcake and other prefered characters. Failure to comply could result in endless whining and complaining. it sounds dumb , but the choosing of the stupid little characters on the bandaids are a great distraction from the boo boo. I will just go ahead and say it , Yes I have worn hello kitty band aids.

At the very least, it takes virtually no space and adds no discernable weight to your wallet just to throw some bandaids in there.

I do carry and use them frequently . I also carry one of those flat single use triple antibiotic packets
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#25 Chris Szaroleta

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 10:25 AM

Yes I have worn hello kitty band aids.

 

This gave me the warm and fuzzies..


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#26 Duff72

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 12:07 PM

This gave me the warm and fuzzies..


Glad I could help.
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#27 coldwater

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 08:14 AM

Moleskin for blisters

I gotta sy this is one of the most often overlooked items in every bag. An Army travels on it's feet, and when they go, trip over. A nasty blister will immobilize you, and cause pain for a long time afterwards. First sign of any irritation, use it. Sooner the better.


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#28 Chris Szaroleta

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Posted 22 February 2015 - 10:04 AM

I gotta sy this is one of the most often overlooked items in every bag. An Army travels on it's feet, and when they go, trip over. A nasty blister will immobilize you, and cause pain for a long time afterwards. First sign of any irritation, use it. Sooner the better.

 

That's exactly right!  Same goes for hiking without proper fitting boots.  

 

Hot spots lead to blisters, blisters lead to debilitating pain, which then leads to a long and awful hike back to civilization.  



#29 KCARF

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Posted 22 March 2015 - 08:43 PM

Adventure Medical Kits are the best for simple Medical EDC. The Pocket Medic or the .3, .5 or .7 kits are great small kits.

 

I carry a small ziplock with Combat Gauze, a SWAT Tourniquet, and Gloves as well. ITS Tactical sells something like this.

 

As far as tampons. NO! We want a clot to form, that is how we control bleeding. A tampon is not designed to form a clot, this could be very bad for a women. Tampons are designed to pull blood away and not form a clot. Will a clot form, yeah possibly, but this is not the design of a tampon. Get the right tool for the job. If you are concerned about severe bleeding use a tourniquet or hemostatic agent (Combat Gauze).


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#30 Renegade Pilgrim

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Posted 24 March 2015 - 07:41 PM

Ahem...as a lady myself, which I know are rare in these here parts...I carry a couple of max absorbant maxi-pads in my FAK for the great outdoors.  They are designed to absorb large amounts of liquid and when combined with pressure, will usually stop major bleeding.  They also work great if you have a big ol fat blister that is draining a lot of fluid.

 

For an urban EDC FAK, I am going super light and using an Adventure Medical Kit .3 and will supplement as needed.  My employer has a decent FAK in the office on each level, so if I hurt myself at work, I am covered.  The rest of the time, it's nice to have a bandaid or some pain meds if needed.

 

I have 14 years of Emergency Medicine experience, including Trauma, Burns and other fun stuff & I am a AHA BLS CPR Instructor as well.  I do know just enough to be dangerous.  :)


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#31 Chris Szaroleta

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Posted 25 March 2015 - 03:15 PM

Ahem...as a lady myself, which I know are rare in these here parts...I carry a couple of max absorbant maxi-pads in my FAK for the great outdoors.  They are designed to absorb large amounts of liquid and when combined with pressure, will usually stop major bleeding.  They also work great if you have a big ol fat blister that is draining a lot of fluid.

 

For an urban EDC FAK, I am going super light and using an Adventure Medical Kit .3 and will supplement as needed.  My employer has a decent FAK in the office on each level, so if I hurt myself at work, I am covered.  The rest of the time, it's nice to have a bandaid or some pain meds if needed.

 

I have 14 years of Emergency Medicine experience, including Trauma, Burns and other fun stuff & I am a AHA BLS CPR Instructor as well.  I do know just enough to be dangerous.   :)

 

I actually keep a cylindrical mass of absorbent material attached to a string in my EDC FAK.  That's right, I didn't use the "T" word... haha!  I asked a female coworker if there was a more clinical term, but she wasn't aware of one.   :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 

 

Anyway, I was able to use one of these (which I swiped from my wife) one time to assist in slowing a nose bleed of another coworker.  Worked like a charm!   


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#32 Stupendous Walrus

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 03:50 PM

I actually keep a cylindrical mass of absorbent material attached to a string in my EDC FAK.  That's right, I didn't use the "T" word... haha!  I asked a female coworker if there was a more clinical term, but she wasn't aware of one.   :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
 
Anyway, I was able to use one of these (which I swiped from my wife) one time to assist in slowing a nose bleed of another coworker.  Worked like a charm!

 
That's what I've seen them used for. Used to keep a couple in the sideline FAK we had when I played high school football.

 

Ahem...as a lady myself, which I know are rare in these here parts...I carry a couple of max absorbant maxi-pads in my FAK for the great outdoors.  They are designed to absorb large amounts of liquid and when combined with pressure, will usually stop major bleeding.  They also work great if you have a big ol fat blister that is draining a lot of fluid.
 
For an urban EDC FAK, I am going super light and using an Adventure Medical Kit .3 and will supplement as needed.  My employer has a decent FAK in the office on each level, so if I hurt myself at work, I am covered.  The rest of the time, it's nice to have a bandaid or some pain meds if needed.
 
I have 14 years of Emergency Medicine experience, including Trauma, Burns and other fun stuff & I am a AHA BLS CPR Instructor as well.  I do know just enough to be dangerous.  :)

Thanks for chiming in with a more...shall we say relevant opinion Renegade. We do have a smattering of female members here, which is not only great for breaking down stereotypes, but also provides a wonderful perspective that none of us (not so) gentlemanly folk can.
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#33 Tim

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 10:26 PM

Here's a picture of my minimalist FAK: http://everydaycarry...inimalist-FAK-#


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#34 Renegade Pilgrim

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Posted 30 March 2015 - 11:53 PM

I actually keep a cylindrical mass of absorbent material attached to a string in my EDC FAK.  That's right, I didn't use the "T" word... haha!  I asked a female coworker if there was a more clinical term, but she wasn't aware of one.   :lol:  :lol:  :lol:

 

Anyway, I was able to use one of these (which I swiped from my wife) one time to assist in slowing a nose bleed of another coworker.  Worked like a charm!   

 

We used to use something similar in the ER for nosebleeds, as well.  The "T" word is actually a shortening of tamponade which literally means closure or blockage, especially to stop bleeding.

 

I rode my Vespa across the US a while ago, and one of the guys I was riding with had a diabetic ulcer on his rear end.  We used a maxi-pad to absorb the drainage, as well as to provide some needed cushioning.

 

I'm happy to provide a lady-perspective and super stoked to learn from y'all about all the EDC stuff.  I am having way too much fun!


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#35 Dom

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 10:19 AM

 
I'm happy to provide a lady-perspective


Most of us will likely benefit from that ;)
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#36 Chris Szaroleta

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Posted 02 April 2015 - 10:52 AM

We used to use something similar in the ER for nosebleeds, as well.  The "T" word is actually a shortening of tamponade which literally means closure or blockage, especially to stop bleeding.

 

I rode my Vespa across the US a while ago, and one of the guys I was riding with had a diabetic ulcer on his rear end.  We used a maxi-pad to absorb the drainage, as well as to provide some needed cushioning.

 

I'm happy to provide a lady-perspective and super stoked to learn from y'all about all the EDC stuff.  I am having way too much fun!

 

Nice, Renegade!  A bit of education in there as well.  Thanks!



#37 Dan Post

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Posted 09 May 2015 - 08:49 PM

I am CPR, AED, and First Aid certified, so I figured I'd start carrying these two things in my EDC backpack. Thankfully I've never had to use the CPR face shield, but I'm sure I will end up needed the first aid kit for myself or someone else eventually. I think it's a great idea to keep a FAK on you or close by, you never know when you will be the only one there to help an injured/unconscious person!

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#38 armydoc

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Posted 11 October 2015 - 09:33 PM

TAMPONS-  As far as tampons being used to plug holes in limbs the answer is YES they do work, and Combat Medics have been using them since at least Vietnam. A Special Forces Physician Assistant taught my class about the use of tampons for gunshot wounds, and he swore by them.

 

There are better things to use now and days such as Quick Clot combat gauze, Celox, etc. but a tampon will work in a pinch. They are cheap, and effective.

 

You never want to use any of these clotting materials in a penetrating wound to the chest. These clotting materials should only be used for bleeds in the limbs.

 

For the chest you want to use a chest seal to prevent a sucking chest wound and the collapse of the lungs. You can make a chest seal out of a plastic square from a food wrapper and some tape. Watch a video on youtube.

 

Something else to remember that when you are dealing with penetrating wounds you want to be reasonably clean in what you are doing, but sterility is really out the window. A bullet and even a stab wound will drive material from the victims clothes and other debris deep into the body. The victim will be on massive antibiotics when they get to higher level of care. Your concern is speed and efficiency in working to stop major bleeding and keeping a good airway.

 

Also when dealing with a penetrating wound ALWAYS make sure to look for an exit wound, you will need to put a chest seal on that as well if there is an exit wound in the torso. Be aware that a bullet wound path does not always go straight in and out. The bullet could enter above a persons nipple and exit out by their kidney.

 

DO YOU CARRY A FIREARM?- For all you EDC guys and gals out there who carry a firearm for personal defense like myself, if you feel the need to carry a firearm to defend yourself against mortal danger it is a good idea to be able to treat gunshot wounds and have a minimal amount of gear on your person to do so when you are running around so you can render aid to another person or self treat if needed.

 

DEVELOPING A KIT- As far as developing a personal First Aid Kit I suggest first asking yourself what type of illness and injuries am I preparing for? Once you define that, you can start to build your kit.

 

There is a distinct difference in my opinion between a Individual First Aid Kit (IFAK) that is set up for minor scrapes, headaches and the sniffles versus gunshot wounds, stab wounds and severe burns. It is okay to have both, but again you have to define what you are expecting to encounter.

 

You also might want to keep the items separated, in a SHTF situation you do not want to be pulling out sniffle meds and stuff when you are trying to treat yourself or someone else for a gunshot wound. Remember your motor skills are going to become much less effective under stress.

 

ADVANCED SKILLS- For you folks interested in getting advanced First Aid skills, look into your local community college. They usually have a "First Responder Course" and EMT classes. You could become EMT-B (Basic) certified in one semester.

 

The knowledge you will gain from these courses will be very empowering for you and your family.

 

READING MATERIAL- Some books you guys might like to read are "Ditch Medicine", "Where There is no Doctor", Where There is no Dentist" and lastly "The Special Forces Medical Handbook".


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#39 WallyGator

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 05:12 PM

If you don't have access to a CPR mask, a bandana or handkerchief will work. Maybe not as good but any thing that you can breathe through will protect you.



#40 armydoc

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Posted 12 October 2015 - 08:08 PM

Regarding CPR, the American Heart Association changed up their guidelines several years back dropping the mouth to mouth aspect all together and relying solely on chest compressions.

 

They state that chest compressions alone are as good or better that the old CPR method. The specifics to the compressions has changed slightly as well.

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=zuJkRpJ7Fxg  American Heart Association hands only CPR link.

 

I believe they simplified it to encourage more people to act, and help alleviate the fear of catching a disease that can come from mouth to mouth contact.







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