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Minimalist FAK

fak minimalist

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#1 Cthulhu

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 12:45 PM

Hi guys.

Currently, I don't carry a first aid kit. However, I feel the need to start carrying something for the urban emergencies, but I want to keep things very minimalistic.

I will tailor your suggestions to my needs, but for now I was thinking about the following needs:

- cuts;

- bruises;

- pain relief.

 

Carry method: pockets or backpack (Tasmanian Tiger Essential Pack - 6 liters).

 

I will add my bronchitis inhaler, for obvious reasons, and some sugar because my wife is diabetic. Also I will add an ice-pack, because I have a benign tumor which is affected by pressure changes (I can predict weather! :huh:).

Besides that, I'm looking for something as simple and light as possible.

What do you think?



#2 Duff72

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 04:45 PM

Bandaids, triple antibiotic, butterfly closures, quality sharp tweezers, ibuprofen for pain fever and swelling. Immodium also helps. individual use crazy glue for closing cuts
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#3 Duff72

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 07:35 PM

Moleskin for blisters
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#4 Plumblucky1

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Posted 15 November 2014 - 12:38 PM

couple of sterile gauze rolls and a roll of athletic tape or some type of tape.

#5 Eli

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 12:02 PM

I'll add my 2 cents worth. I have a small "Altoids" first-aid kit that I carry around with me, as well as the larger one in my car/van. If you are looking for an EDC, minimalist, kit for 1 person with minor injuries, then the following should suffice.

 

1. Bandages: I tend to stay away from the individually wrapped on-size-fits-all bandages. I tend to go with the roller bandages that you cut to the size you need. Since this is part of an EDC, I am assuming you will have scissors or at least a knife to cut it.

2. Duck Tape. I know, it's the go-to tape. But, it works remarkably well to hold down gauze, can be used as a butterfly closure, or to cover a blister.

3. Gauze pads. Go with 1x1, 2x2, or 4x4 depending on the size of your container. I have 1x1 and 2x2 in mine.

4. individual crazy glue is awesome for paper cuts and minor scrapes.

5. Drugs. If you want to add some pain relievers, choose the ones you regularly use. Tylenol, aspirin, Advil or the generic brands. Imodium, Pepto Bismol, or other digestive upset settlers are a good idea as well.

 

This is a minimal list that I would suggest for urban use. I take this sort of thing to work with me, keep it on me when traveling, etc. As I said, my car has a larger, more robust kit, and my house has a ton of supplies I use to restock everything else.



#6 Stupendous Walrus

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 05:25 PM

Bandaids obviously, i recommend a travel soze tube of burn cream, anything over the counter. Also, Flamazine is great, but may be a prescription depending on your area. Liquid skin is a saviour too.

All these things can be found in small, compact travel-type sizes.

#7 Duff72

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Posted 04 December 2014 - 09:29 PM

You can also fill straws cut to size with triple antibiotic or other meds can be sealed with hot pliers. You tube can show you how. They are pretty durable and size to suit your needs. Some straws work better than others.
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#8 Jay R Sims

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 02:10 AM

Each of my bags has a first aid kit proportionate to the bag size. The kits are mostly for urban use, except our family kit which is also to cover hiking. 

 

My day back pack and hydration pack use sandwich size Ziploc first aid kit, with the following contents:

  • Fabric band aids of varying sizes; 10 of the standard size, 5 of the smaller size, 3 of the other sizes.
  • Panadol; x 1 tin packet
  • Asthma inhaler
  • Antacid; 1 tin packet for reflux
  • Eye drops – for eye strain
  • Berocca tube – perk up my energy
  • Sports tape – for when I strain my knees from taekwondo
  • Saline solution - to clean wounds
  • Sunscreen
  • Hydrolyte powder
  • Minirin nasal spray  - for my partners diabetes insipidus

I use either of the above bags depending on the extra material I need to carry, I ride my bicycle between jobs and I do Taekwondo up to twice a week. Most of the content won’t have the box packaging I ensure to keep it all minimal and light.

When I run with my dogs I use my sports holster from Urban Tool, and take a couple of band aids, a half a tin packet of Panadol and an asthma inhaler.
 

In me and my partners car, we carry a family size first aid kit to cover me, my partner and our two whippets. The kit includes basic first aid for animals - animal friendly products. We also have a condensed version for hiking depending on how long we are away for.



#9 Robert Fejes

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 08:09 PM

Just ordered an Adventure Medical Kits Ultra Light .5 for my day pack. I might add an elastic bandage but that should do it for a personal kit.

#10 John

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Posted 24 December 2014 - 12:28 AM

You can also fill straws cut to size with triple antibiotic or other meds can be sealed with hot pliers. You tube can show you how. They are pretty durable and size to suit your needs. Some straws work better than others.

This is very interesting! 

I'll add my 2 cents worth. I have a small "Altoids" first-aid kit that I carry around with me, as well as the larger one in my car/van. If you are looking for an EDC, minimalist, kit for 1 person with minor injuries, then the following should suffice.

 

1. Bandages: I tend to stay away from the individually wrapped on-size-fits-all bandages. I tend to go with the roller bandages that you cut to the size you need. Since this is part of an EDC, I am assuming you will have scissors or at least a knife to cut it.

2. Duck Tape. I know, it's the go-to tape. But, it works remarkably well to hold down gauze, can be used as a butterfly closure, or to cover a blister.

3. Gauze pads. Go with 1x1, 2x2, or 4x4 depending on the size of your container. I have 1x1 and 2x2 in mine.

4. individual crazy glue is awesome for paper cuts and minor scrapes.

5. Drugs. If you want to add some pain relievers, choose the ones you regularly use. Tylenol, aspirin, Advil or the generic brands. Imodium, Pepto Bismol, or other digestive upset settlers are a good idea as well.

 

This is a minimal list that I would suggest for urban use. I take this sort of thing to work with me, keep it on me when traveling, etc. As I said, my car has a larger, more robust kit, and my house has a ton of supplies I use to restock everything else.

Im gonna build a "tin" kit for sure now.. stoked! 



#11 John

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Posted 24 December 2014 - 01:26 AM

A VERY important thing to carry at all times in a FAK is at least a few pairs good rubber gloves... Always use caution... To help others you also need to protect yourself!!! 


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#12 Dom

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Posted 26 December 2014 - 06:03 PM

Liquid skin/ liquid bandage. Won't fit in a tin, but comes in small bottles, easy to carry. Works remarkably well for small cuts & lacerations.

#13 Stupendous Walrus

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Posted 08 January 2015 - 06:32 AM

Are you first aid qualified or is this purely for personal use?

#14 Chris Szaroleta

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Posted 09 January 2015 - 09:14 PM

A VERY important thing to carry at all times in a FAK is at least a few pairs good rubber gloves... Always use caution... To help others you also need to protect yourself!!! 

SOOOOOOOOO true!  If you're ever in a real emergency situation, gloves are a must.  Not just for your protection, either.  


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#15 John

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 11:28 PM

My sister was an EMT and always had a nifty oneway CPR mask valve thing that was amazing, but bulky... maybe something to keep in the car


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#16 David Quevedo

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 04:11 PM

I've yet to EDC a first aid kit; but I have a feeling that'll be changing, this year :-).  I'll probably carry it in my backpack.



#17 Duff72

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Posted 12 January 2015 - 06:47 PM

Liquid skin/ liquid bandage. Won't fit in a tin, but comes in small bottles, easy to carry. Works remarkably well for small cuts & lacerations.


I switched this item to Krazy glue (use the brand name stuff) it holds much better on larger cuts and is also a multi purpose item for and EDC kit and you can also get it in small single use tubes.
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#18 Jambon

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 04:23 PM

Do a course. The best thing to edc is your training. Plasters and pain killers are useful as well.
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#19 Mikey Bautista

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 10:58 PM

I've been hearing that tampons are good to shove into large wounds since it's designed to both absorb a lot of blood and also expand into the wound for easier clotting. Can anyone verify this?



#20 David Quevedo

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Posted 21 January 2015 - 11:09 PM

I've been hearing that tampons are good to shove into large wounds since it's designed to both absorb a lot of blood and also expand into the wound for easier clotting. Can anyone verify this?

 

I've heard this, as well.


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